FAQs

1. What is the SPV phone?

  • A smart phone from Orange that runs on Microsoft’s Smartphone 2002 operating system.

2. Who manufactures the SPV phone?

  • High Tech Computer (HTC).

3. How much will the SPV phone cost in the United Kingdom?

  • 179 pounds ($277).

4. What features does the SPV phone have?

  • Sound, pictures, video, and a digital camera add-on.

5. When will the SPV phone be available in the United States?

  • Likely not until next year.

6. Which U.S. carriers have committed to releasing devices running Microsoft’s Smartphone 2002 operating system?

  • Verizon Wireless, Cingular Wireless, and AT&T Wireless.

7. What is the difference between Pocket PC Phone Edition and Smartphone 2002?

  • Pocket PC Phone Edition devices have a large screen and lack a number pad, while Smartphone 2002 devices look like slightly bulkier cell phones with a jog dial.

8. Which companies have committed to making phones that will run Smartphone 2002?

  • Samsung, HTC, among others.

9. Which major cell phone makers have balked at supporting Microsoft’s efforts?

  • Nokia and Motorola.

10. Which operating system are Nokia, Motorola, Ericsson, Samsung, and Siemens planning to use in their phones?

  • Symbian.

11. How much does the Siemens Pocket PC Phone edition device sell for through AT&T Wireless?

  • $550.

12. Is the SPV phone the first smart phone on the market?

  • No, there are already wireless handhelds running Microsoft’s Pocket PC Phone Edition on the market.

Summary

The SPV phone, manufactured by HTC and sold by Orange in the United Kingdom, is a smart phone that runs on Microsoft’s Smartphone 2002 operating system. It features sound, pictures, video, and a digital camera add-on. While the SPV phone is not yet available in the United States, several major carriers have committed to releasing devices running Smartphone 2002 next year.

Microsoft believes that the market for Smartphone 2002 devices is much larger than that of wireless handhelds, which run on Microsoft’s Pocket PC Phone Edition. The latter devices have a large screen and lack a number pad, while Smartphone 2002 devices look like slightly bulkier cell phones with a jog dial.

Samsung is the lone licensee of Microsoft’s Smartphone software among the top five handset makers, with Nokia and Motorola balking at publicly supporting Microsoft’s efforts. These companies, along with Ericsson and Siemens, are planning to make phones using a rival operating system called Symbian.

The SPV phone is a significant step forward in the development of smart phones, and it is likely to be followed by a wave of similar devices from other manufacturers. As these devices become more affordable and feature-rich, they are likely to become increasingly popular with consumers.